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Do You Want a Promotion?

A study in Canada revealed that employees who used their Employee Assistance Program (EAP) were 73% MORE likely to get a promotion than those who did not use the EAP. The study included 6500 women and over 8300 men.  One of the theories as to why this helps employees get promoted is that individuals are able to increase their coping skills so they can better handle the job and life in general. Every little bit helps! Contact us today for new coping skills. 410.328.5860

Recharge Your Battery in 15 minutes

 

New Year’s Resolution 2012:  “I’m going to start taking better care of myself.”

New Year’s Resolution 2013:  “I am REALLY going to take better care of myself.”

New Years’ Resolution 2014: “This year for SURE. I promise to take better care of myself.”

Let us help you achieve your promise to yourself.  Give us 15 minutes a week.  We will help you learn to de-stress, calm down, and be kinder to yourself.

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is offering a 15-minute instruction on how you can begin to take care of yourself. Every Tuesday in the EAP suite 560, from 12:15-12:30, Bridget Mixon, LGSW, will show you how you can feel better in 15 minutes.

February 4, 2014, a snack will be provided during the 15 minutes of Calm this week

February 11, 2014, a new technique will be introduced.

February 18, 2014, a different de-stressing activity will be taught

February 25, 2014, the final skill of the month will be shown to you.

 

In March, we will repeat the techniques again, so you can come and participate, fine tune what you already learned, bring your coworkers, or just use the time with us to force yourself to take a breath!

 

For more information, please call the EAP at 8-5860, or email Maureen at mmccarre@psych.umaryland.edu.

Good Mood Foods

In the January 14, 2014 Washington Post, author Maya Dangerfield writes about food that can boost your mood. She states, “Researchers have studied the association between foods and the brain and identified 10 nutrients that can combat depression and boost mood: calcium, chromium, folate, iron, magnesium, omega-3 fatty acids, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D and zinc. Her article goes on to identify which foods you should eat to make sure you are getting the nutrients you need to boost serotonin and other neurotransmitters the body relies on to help maintain a positive outlook on life.  Consult with your doctor or nutritionist for more information for your body.  Also, feel free to make an appointment in the EAP for help with talking through some of the issues in your life that are weighing you down.

Grief Support Group, February 2014

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has held a few different Grief Support Groups in the past. All have been very well received.  So, we are planning on starting another one.  It will begin on February 10, 2014 and last through April 14, 2014. Group will meet weekly, during lunchtime, noon-1:00p.m. in the EAP suite.  Space is limited, so call or mail us to register for the group as soon as you can.  Also, feel free to contact us if you have any questions.  Wanda Binns, EAP Manager, will be facilitating the group.  You can reach her at 410.328.5860, or email at wbinns@psych.umaryland.edu.

Grief Support Group, Jan 13, 2014

Support Group Forming

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has held a few different Grief Support Groups in the past. All have been very well received.  So, we are planning on starting another one.  It will begin on January 13, 2014 and last through March 24, 2014. (Group will not meet on January 20, 2014 due to the MLK holiday.) There will be weekly meetings, during lunchtime, noon-1:00p.m. in the EAP suite.  Space is limited, so call or mail us to register for the group as soon as you can.  Also, feel free to contact us if you have any questions.  Wanda Binns, EAP Manager, will be facilitating the group.  You can reach her at 410.328.5860, or email at wbinns@psych.umaryland.edu.

Grief Support Group- Jan 13, 2014

Support Group Forming

The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has held a few different Grief Support Groups in the past. All have been very well received.  So, we are planning on starting another one.  It will begin on January 13, 2014 and last through March 24, 2014. (Group will not meet on January 20, 2014 due to the MLK holiday.) There will be weekly meetings, during lunchtime, noon-1:00p.m. in the EAP suite.  Space is limited, so call or mail us to register for the group as soon as you can.  Also, feel free to contact us if you have any questions.  Wanda Binns, EAP Manager, will be facilitating the group.  You can reach her at 410.328.5860, or email at wbinns@psych.umaryland.edu.

Tune Up Your Relationship

Let the EAP help you and your partner

Does your relationship need a tune up?”  If you are unsure, ask yourself the following questions;

  1. Do you have the intimacy you’ve always desired?
  2. Is undivided attention something you give and receive daily?
  3. Do you and your significant other date regularly?
  4. Is the communication in your relationship clear, caring, complete and continuous?

Don’t be surprised if you are unable to answer “yes” to all questions.  Though we often have the best of intentions, managing careers, children, family obligations and activities of daily life create challenges to making relationships a priority.

Just like vehicles need regular maintenance to run smoothly, relationships also need routine care to stay vigorous.  The EAP provides short- term, couples’ counseling to assist you in returning your union to a positive path or helping your bond stay strong.  Call the Employee Assistance Program at 410-328-5860 today and schedule an appointment with Sue Walker, Wanda Binns, Maureen McCarren or  Monique Church.  Whether you have been committed twelve months or forty years, every relationship needs a tune up.

Relationship need a little Readjusting?

Would you and your spouse or significant other like to learn a few new tips to improve your relationship?  A couple of the EAP counselors learned some new approaches to help people improve communication and understanding between partners.  They would like to share them with you beginning in October, for 5 sessions. Call the EAP at 8-5860 to sign up or for additional information. Space is limited to 5 couples so sign up soon!

Road Rage

Do you or someone you love suffer from Road Rage?  It can hurt you.  If one person becomes more aggressive in his/her driving, it leads to others doing the same.  Behind the wheel, before you are even aware of it, you can exhibit physical effects such as your hands gripping the wheel, blood pressure rising, heart rate increasing, neck and jaw muscles getting tense, etc. There are some things you can do.  First, recognize what is happening to you.  Set up your smart phone before you begin your trip to record you while you are driving. Play it back later and listen to yourself.  You may be surprised as to how you sound. While you are driving, do some things to lighten your mood.  Sing silly songs, make excuses for the driver (even if they are not true), such as “Oh, he must be trying to get to a job interview, after being out of work for 2 years. He can go ahead.” Try and remember that your perspective is what influences your feelings.  Look at things differently.

For further discussion about this, contact the EAP for individual sessions to help you cope with your anger or road rage.

Facebook Can Make Users Feel Worse

A University of Michigan study found that time spent on Facebook could decrease a person’s mood. Other studies have found that increased envy can occur while reading other people’s Facebook pages. On the other hand, a study at the University of Wisconsin found that Facebook users could increase their self-esteem. In general, it seems that Facebook use, within which many activities take place, can have different effects on different people. Thus, it is important for users to be aware of their own responses as they use Facebook, monitor their moods and change behavior as needed.

If you think talking with someone would help you, call the EAP at 8-5860 and schedule an appointment to meet with a counselor