Click to Call
Events

July 20 Webinar: Taming Anxiety and the Return to “Normal”

Taming Anxiety and the Return to “Normal” Join us for a free webinar sponsored by the University of Maryland Baltimore Department of Psychiatry EAP Programs. Tuesday, July 20, 2021 at 3:00 pm For over a year we have not known ‘what comes next’. Carefully, we can move back to our pre-pandemic lives, but we are […]

May 18 Webinar: Living in Today

Video Recording A video recording of this webinar is available for you to watch. Living in Today Cherish Yesterday. Dream Tomorrow. Live Today. Join us for a free webinar sponsored by the University of Maryland Baltimore Department of Psychiatry EAP Programs. Tuesday, May 18, 2021 at 3:00 pm This webinar will provide tools needed to: […]

Apr 20 Webinar: Stress Resiliency in the Climate of COVID

Join us for a free webinar sponsored by the University of Maryland Baltimore Department of Psychiatry EAP Programs. Stress Resiliency in the Climate of COVID Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 3:00 pm This webinar will outline: Characteristics of resilient individuals How to identify your personal resiliency Ways to improve your wellbeing The pandemic has impacted […]

Jan 19 Webinar: Managing Compassion Fatigue During COVID-19

Join us for a free webinar sponsored by the University of Maryland Baltimore Department of Psychiatry EAP Programs. Managing Compassion Fatigue through Self-Care Strategies during COVID-19 Tuesday, January 19, 2021 at 3:00 pm Professionals in the healthcare and education fields are at a greater risk for developing burnout and Compassion Fatigue due to excessive practice […]

Wellness

Assistance for Care Givers

Regina Curran, who is a Geriatric Care Manager, came to the EAP and presented information to employees about what professionals in her area can do to help families who have an elderly relative or friend for whom they are caring.  She explained that they also help families with young or disabled children who need resources, especially with Mental Health resources.  Sometimes families also need a Home Health Aid. The Care Manger can help a family get connected to one.

All in all, a Care Manger can help you in many arenas. Their website is www.midatlanticgcm.org. On it is stated, “A Geriatric Care Manager specializes in assisting older people and their families with long-term care arrangements. We can help you meet the challenges of long distance care giving, put together a comprehensive plan for present or future needs, provide extra assistance for relocation, or monitor your relative during your vacation.”

A Geriatric Care Manager will meet with the family and do an assessment, which generally takes 2 hours.  Then, they can help the family put resources in place.  However, a Geriatric Care Manager can also just consult with a family and give suggestions or recommendations.  They can help educate families about what programs are available for additional services. They can be helpful to families whose loved one lives in Maryland, but can also help with long distance cases.

An interesting book for Care Givers to read is “The 36-Hour Day.”  One interesting caveat Regina shared is that Care Givers often don’t take care of themselves like they should.  Often, a Care Giver will pass away before the person they are caring for because of neglecting their own health.  So, self-care is important to all. Contact the EAP to find out the myriad of possibilities for people to take care of themselves.  Your loved one will thank you for it!!

Sad During the Winter?

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Many people suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder, otherwise known as SAD, during the fall and winter when there is less exposure to sunlight.  Sunlight triggers the production of serotonin, a chemical in the brain that helps regulate mood, among other things.  Many people have found that supplementation with Vitamin D can help.  Talk with your doctor to see if this might be a good strategy for you.

Stress Can Interfere with Sleep

How Can I Sleep Better?

Stress often interferes with sleep, which then can make the next day more difficult to manage.  If this continues, it can lead to depression, anxiety, irritability, and forgetfulness.  Many anti-depressants are effective because they help people sleep better.

Some people want to try natural ways to increase sleep and then boost mood.  First, take an inventory of your current habits.  Are you ingesting too much caffeine or drinking it too late in the day? Try decreasing coffee, tea, chocolate, and stop all caffeinated products by 2:00 p.m. Cigarettes, although initially relaxing for the smoker, are stimulants and add to sleep problems. Exercise is great to help people sleep better, but don’t do vigorous exercise late in the day or right before bed. Gentle stretching or a long walk late at night is better to help people sleep.  Alcohol helps people  feel sleepy but it interferes with the deepest phases of sleep and causes frequent nighttime awakenings. Do you have a medical problem such as back pain, or a thyroid disorder that may interfere with sleep?  Or, is the medication you’re taking hampering sleep? Try a little meditation or yoga and see if that helps you.  For more information, or to talk with someone about the issues that are bothering you or worrying you, call the EAP at 410.328.5860. Sometimes, having an objective person help you look at things differently can help decrease stress.  Sweet dreams!

Aging Gracefully

How to Maintain Brain Health

As we age, we need to exercise our brains in various ways to keep them sharp.  Some ways to do that are:

  • Exercise -especially aerobic exercise such as running, walking, playing basketball, dancing, hiking, swimming, and tennis.
  • Eat right-vegetables, fruits, protein and be sure to drink enough water. Stay away from anything white-sugar, white rice, white potatoes. Remember, the darker the color, the more nutrients in the fruit or vegetable. For instance, eat more blueberries and dark green leafy vegetables.
  • Challenge your brain to work in novel ways-take a different route to work, learn something new on the computer, learn a new language (no matter how long it takes you!) start a new hobby or craft, take a class, use your non-dominant hand to brush your teeth, learn how to play a musical instrument, etc.
  • Explore new places or cultures; try different food and possibly learn how to make it.
  • Surround yourself with stimulating people and situations, go to museums, concerts, sporting events, etc.